UNDERAGE DRINKING IN OREGON

www.ZeroAttempts.org

Welcome to Oregon. Let's get drunk.

Oregon legislature makes it legal to let your kids drink. The only restriction seems to be that it needs to be in parents' or guardian's residence and the parent or guardian needs to be home. They don't have to be present, however.
(Underage drinking is not really that cute when you know the long-term effects and brain damage.)

:30
Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving

Underage Drinking cost Oregonians over $600 million in 2013
Alcohol and Minors

Underage Drinking Starts With An Excuse
Wasted - A video aimed at curbing underage drinking and driving
Keeping alcohol out of the hands of minors
What you can do
Oregon's Alcohol Laws and Minors
Anti-Furnishing Campaign Targets Parents
Alcohol Energy Drinks
Prom and Graduation Tips for Parents Keeping teens alcohol-free this Prom and Graduation Season
Related Links

Eight Different Exceptions to the Minimum Legal Drinking Age (MLDA) of 21
Liability Laws Make Parents Responsible for Underage Drinking in Their Home

Oregon has state laws that cover "in home". However, Lane County has gone beyond that while the Curry County Commissions and law enforecement have turned down a similar proposal.
Liability Laws Make Parents Responsible for Underage Drinking in Their Home

State by State (& Washington, DC) Guide to Underage Alcohol Consumption Laws and Exceptions
45 States That Allow Underage (under 21) Alcohol Consumption
Should the Drinking Age Be Lowered from 21 to a Younger Age?
Teenage Drinking: Understanding the Dangers and Talking to Your Child
Explanation of the Eight Exceptions to the MLDA
How your state's politicians make underage drinking legal
Teen Drinking at Home: Helpful or Harmful?
Should Parents Let Teens Drink At Home?
Related issues:
Binge Drinking, Drinking Too Much, Drunk Driving, Teen Alcohol,  Don't Lower the Drinking Age

Underage Drinking cost Oregonians over $600 million in 2013


Tragic health, social, and economic problems result from the use of alcohol by youth. Underage drinking is a causal factor in a host of serious problems, including homicide, suicide, traumatic injury, drowning, burns, violent and property crime, high-risk sex, fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol poisoning, and the need for treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence.

Problems and Costs Associated with Underage Drinking in Oregon

In 2013, underage drinking cost the citizens of Oregon $0.6 billion. These costs include medical care, work loss, and pain and suffering associated with the multiple problem resulting from the use of alcohol by youth.1 This translates to $1,695 per year for each youth in the state or $3.43 per drink consumed underage. Excluding pain and suffering from these costs, tangible costs of underage drinking including medical care, criminal justice, property damage, and loss of work in Oregon totaled $249.88 million each year or $1.45 per drink. In contrast, a drink in Oregon retails for $0.96.

Costs of Underage Drinking Oregon, 2013 $

Pain and Suffering Costs

$339.2 M

Work Lost Costs

$135.5 M

Medical Costs

$114.6 M

Total

$0.6 billion

Youth violence (homicide, suicide, aggravated assault) and traffic crashes attributable to alcohol use by underage youth in Oregon represent the largest costs for the state. However, a host of other problems contribute substantially to the overall cost. Among teen mothers, fetal alcohol syndrome alone costs Oregon $14 million.

In 2012, 1,626 youth aged 12 to 20 years were admitted for alcohol treatment in Oregon, accounting for 8% of all treatment admissions for alcohol abuse in the state.2

Young people who begin drinking before age 15 are four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence and are two and a half times more likely to become abusers of alcohol than those who begin drinking at age 21.3 We did not cost these adult problems.

Costs of Underage Drinking by Problem, Oregon, 2013 $
Problem
Total Costs (in millions)

Youth violence

$304.6

Youth traffic crashes

$46.2

High-risk sex, Ages 14–20 years

$32.7

Property and public order crime

$2.7

Youth injury

$40.1

Poisonings and psychoses

$7.5

Fetal alcohol syndrome among mothers aged 15–20 years

$13.9

Youth alcohol treatment

$78.8

Total

$589.7

Alcohol Consumption by Youth in Oregon

Underage drinking is widespread in Oregon. Approximately 117,000 underage customers drink each year in Oregon. In 2013, Oregon students in grades 9 to 12 reported the following:4

  • 67.0% had at least one drink of alcohol on one or more days during their life.
  • 47.4% had their first drink of alcohol, other than a few sips, before age 13.
  • 31.0% had at least one drink of alcohol on one or more occasions in the past 30 days.
  • 17.7% had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row (binge drinking) in the past 30 days.

In 2012, underage customers consumed 7.8% of all alcohol sold in Oregon, totaling $166 million in sales (in 2013 dollars). These sales provided profits of $81 million to the alcohol industry.1 Ranking states based on the percentage of alcohol consumed underage, with 1 the highest, Oregon ranked number 37. This percentage is affected by both adult and youth drinking levels.

Annual sales of alcohol consumed by youth in Oregon averaged $1,416 per underage customer. Underage customers were heavier consumers than adults. They drank an average of 4.0 drinks per day; in contrast, legal customers consumed only 1.9.

Harm Associated with Underage Drinking in Oregon

Underage drinking in Oregon leads to substantial harm due to traffic crashes, violent crime, property crime, unintentional injury, and high-risk sex.

  • During 2012, an estimated 6 traffic fatalities and 72 nonfatal traffic injuries were attributable to driving after underage drinking.
  • In 2012, an estimated 6 homicides; 5,000 nonfatal violent crimes such as rape, robbery, and assault; 11,100 property crimes including burglary, larceny, and car theft; and 208,000 public order crimes including vandalism, disorderly conduct, loitering, and curfew violations were attributable to underage drinking.
  • In 2011, an estimated 4 alcohol-involved fatal burns, drownings, and suicides were attributable to underage drinking.
  • In 2013, an estimated 253 teen pregnancies and 8,578 teens having high-risk sex were attributable to underage drinking.

For comparison with other states, in U.S. rather than state prices, the harm from underage drinking peryouth in Oregon averages $943. Such comparisons require caution. In part, they may reflect differences in crime and crash rates, problem-reporting to police, and co-occurring drug use.

Produced by the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE) with funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), March 2015.

1 Levy, D.T., Miller, T.R., & Cox, K.C. (2003). Underage drinking: societal costs and seller profits. Working Paper. Calverton, MD: PIRE.

2 Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Treatment Episode Data Set. (2013). Substance Abuse Treatment by Primary Substance of Abuse, According to Sex, Age, Race, and Ethnicity, 2011. Available [Online]: www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/SAMHDA/studies/30462

3 Grant, B.F., & Dawson, D.A. (1997). Age at onset of alcohol use and its association with DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence: Results from the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey. Journal of Substance Abuse 9: 103-110.

4 Oregon Public Health Division (2014). 2013 Oregon Healthy Teens (OHT) Survey. Available [Online]: public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Documents/2013/2013_OHT_State_Report.pdf
Source: www.oregon.gov/adpc/docs/Underage%20Drinking%20Costs%20Oregon%202015%20Report%202013-UAD-Costs-PIRE-Report.pdf

Eight Different Exceptions to the Minimum Legal Drinking Age (MLDA) of 2


Oregon legislature makes it legal to let your kids drink. Underage consumption of alcohol is allowed in Oregon under the following situations:

1. on private, non alcohol-selling premises, with parental consent
2. for religious purposes (though I haven't found a religious organization in Brookings that supports this.)
3. for government work related purposes

Liability Laws Make Parents Responsible for Underage Drinking in Their Home


Parents who allow their teens to have friends over to drink, thinking it’s a safe way to keep them off the roads, may be surprised to find they are subject to liability laws that make them vulnerable to lawsuits, fines and jail time.

Parents in some states can be liable even if they were not aware that drinking was going on in their home, according to the Associated Press. One Stanford University professor was arrested in November after his 17-year-old son had a party in the basement. The professor, Bill Burnett, said he had forbidden alcohol at the party and had twice checked on the teens. He spent one night in jail and was booked on 44 counts of suspicion of contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Each count carries up to a $2,500 fine and almost a year in jail.

Eight states have “social host” laws that make parents liable if underage guests in their home are drinking, even if no harm comes to anyone, the AP reports. In some of the states, parents are allowed to serve alcohol to their own children in certain situations.

In 16 other states, laws hold parents responsible for underage drinking in some circumstances, such as if a teenager who drank in their home was in a car accident.

Research conducted by Students Against Destructive Decisions, and co-sponsored by the insurance company Liberty Mutual, found 41 percent of teens say their parents allow them to go to parties where alcohol is being served, compared with 36 percent two years ago.
Source: www.drugfree.org/join-together/alcohol/liability-laws-make-parents-responsible-for-underage-drinking-in-their-home?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=ff8012c243-JT_Daily_News_Clergy_Matter1_3_2012&utm_medium=email

8:11

Should Parents Let Teens Drink At Home?


Some parents believe that allowing their teens to have an occasional beer or glass of wine makes alcohol less taboo -- and therefore less enticing to those under 21. Others think that giving drinks to teens at home is dangerous, teaches the wrong lessons and may lead to addiction problems later.

As many as 700,000 kids ages 12 to 14 -- or 6 percent of those in that age group -- said they drank in the past month in a recent report conducted by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Of the 45 percent who said they got the alcohol for free at home, 16 percent said it came from a parent or guardian. The poll didn't ask for details about how much alcohol they consumed or in what situation they had a drink.

One father, Terry Moran, said he won't let his kids drink alcohol until they're legal, according to the "Today" show.

"Because kids start thinking that, 'Hey, if my parents think it's OK, then I can just go experiment, hang out with my friends and drink.' I see it happen all the time," Moran told NBC.

One teen who spoke to NBC said his parents sometimes give him small amounts of alcohol at dinner.

"They would give me alcohol at home first, small doses -- a glass of wine here, maybe a glass of beer with dinner," he said. "It taught me responsibility, for the most part."

Psychologist Elaine Moore says that many teenagers are going to experiment with drinking no matter what, and they're typically not mature enough to handle it well. Mothers and fathers can help, but declined to speculate on whether giving alcohol to teen children at home is the solution.

"I don't think there's a right answer," Moore told NBC. "I think it's really, really important for parents to teach their kids to drink responsibly."

Peter Delany, the director of SAMHSA's Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, said the earlier that teens start drinking, the more likely they are to become alcoholics.

"When kids under age 15 start drinking and drinking heavily, they are about six times more likely to end up with alcohol problems," he told the Wall Street Journal. "This report isn't designed to say, 'Bad parents!' It's designed to say, 'Here's an issue you should pay attention to.'"

In fact, according to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, about 50 percent of young people in America are binge drinking by they time they're 21 and 86 percent of them have consumed alcohol.

"Twenty-five percent of 'Seventeen' readers say their parents let them drink at home," the magazine's editor-in-chief Ann Shoket told "Today." "But what they're learning is not necessarily how to drink. What they're learning is trust."

The research to date is inconclusive on the potential perils of letting your kids drink at home. But no matter what, psychiatrist Janet Taylor believes parents should at least be talking to their children about drinking, especially about the hazards of binge drinking.

"It gets back to the quality of the relationship and how much communication is happening at home," Taylor told the show.
Source: www.aolhealth.com/2011/03/15/should-parents-let-teens-drink-at-home/?icid=main%7Chtmlws-sb-n%7Cdl5%7Csec1_lnk3%7C206130
45 States That Allow Underage (under 21) Alcohol Consumption

How your state's politicians make underage drinking legal


Only 15 states and the District of Columbia make it illegal for someone under 21 to possess or consume alcohol. All other states have laws that permit underage drinking in certain circumstacnes. Nineteen states require only that the drinking goes on in a private setting.

Under Age (21) Drinking Laws

.

May Not
May

State

1
2
3
4
5
6

Alabama

X
.
.
.
.
.

Alaska

.
X
.
.
.
.

Arizona

X
.
.
.
.
.

Arkansas

.
.
X
.
.
.

California

.
.
X
.
.
.

Colorado

.
X
.
.
.
.

Connecticut

.
.
X
.
.
.

Delaware

.
X
.
.
.
.

D.C.

X
.
.
.
.
.

Florida

.
.
X
.
.
.

Georgia

.
X
.
.
.
.

Hawaii

.
.
X
.
.
.

Idaho

X
.
.
.
.
.

Illinois

.
X
.
.
.
.

Indiana

X
.
.
.
.
.

Iowa

.
.
X
.
.
.

Kansas

X
.
.
.
.
.

Kentucky

.
.
X
.
.
.

Louisiana

.
.
.
X
.
.

Maine

.
.
X
.
.
.

Maryland

.
.
X
.
.
.

Massachusetts

.
.
X.
.
.
.

Michigan

X
.
.
.
.
.

Minnesota

.
X
.
.
.
.

Mississippi

.
.
X
.
.
.

Missouri

.
.
.
.
.
X

Montana

.
.
.
.
X
.

Nebraska

.
.
.
.
.
X

Nevada

.
.
X
.
.
.

New Hampshire

.
.
X
.
.
.

New Jersey

.
.
.
.
.
X

New Mexico

.
.
X
.
.
.

New York

.
.
X
.
.
.

North Carolina

X
.
.
.
.
.

North Dakota

X
.
.
.
.
.

Ohio

.
.
.
.
X
.

Oklahoma

.
.
X
.
.
.

Oregon

.
.
.
.
.
X

Pennsylvania

X
.
.
.
.
.

Rhode Island

.
.
X
.
.
.

South Carolina

.
.
X
.
.
.

South Dakota

X
.
.
.
.
.

Tennessee

X
.
.
.
.
.

Texas

.
.
.
.
X
.

Utah

X
.
.
.
.
.

Vermont

X
.
.
.
.
.

Virginia

X
.
.
.
.
.

Washington

.
.
.
.
X
.

West Virginia

X
.
.
.
.
.

Wisconsin

.
.
.
.
X
.

Wyoming

.
.
X
.
.
.

Total States

16
6
19
1
5
4

Legend: 1: possess or consume; 2: consume alcohol only if married AND if spouse or guardian is present; 3: in a private setting; 4. only if married OR if spouse or guardian is present; 5: if parent or guardian is present. 6: in parents' or guardian's residence if parent or guardian is home.
Source:
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20249460/

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